STAKEHOLDERS: A KEY TO PROJECT SUCCESS

STAKEHOLDERS: A KEY TO PROJECT SUCCESS

One the issues frequently faced by lean six sigma belts is the need to secure key stakeholder support for process changes.   Using the DMAIC approach the team should select the solution that best addresses the vital few root causes while also being acceptable to the organization.  In other words the new process needs to correct the process deficiencies AND have the support of the organization.

Oftentimes these changes go counter to “the way we’ve always done it” mindset.  And often the poor performing process was originally developed by a key stakeholder in the organization such as a senior manager or someone with established competence or experience in the process.  While stating their support to improve it, frequently these individuals are not all that keen to see “their baby” changed.

So how does the belt address this potential roadblock when the stakeholder’s support may be lacking?

A key step is for the lead belt and the team is to identify the key stakeholders who could be in a position to impact the implementation of a new process.  Then the lead belt needs to engage with that stakeholder.

The most effective ways to bring a resistant stakeholder along are with engagement and good data.  Every LSS project requires data to measure performance and identify key factors that influence process variation and poor performance.  But that same data can hold the key to bringing a reluctant stakeholder along with you.

From the very beginning of the project key stakeholders should be identified and those who potentially may be resistant to change should be identified.  Seek out and engage those stakeholders.  Solicit their support and ideas.  Then as you move through the project supported by good process data show the stakeholder the facts.  Objective process “facts” will most often bring those stakeholders along.

The lead belt should not disagree with stakeholders.  They should objectively present the evidence in the form of good, valid and properly collected and analyzed data to show the stakeholder the facts of the process.  Questions such as “Have we missed something here” or “Would you interpret these results differently?” demonstrate your concern for the stakeholder’s position.

Stakeholder engagement should not be an end of project activity but an on-going one from the start of the project.  The last thing any team needs is to get to the Control Phase of a DMAIC project only to have a critical stakeholder communicate “not on my watch.”

Engage stakeholders early and often and bring them the objective evidence in the form of properly analyzed and displayed data.  In so doing the likelihood of DMAIC project success will soar and your solution will not only address the key root causes but also have the support of the organization.One the issues frequently faced by lean six sigma belts is the need to secure key stakeholder support for process changes.   Using the DMAIC approach the team should select the solution that best addresses the vital few root causes while also being acceptable to the organization.  In other words the new process needs to correct the process deficiencies AND have the support of the organization.

Oftentimes these changes go counter to “the way we’ve always done it” mindset.  And often the poor performing process was originally developed by a key stakeholder in the organization such as a senior manager or someone with established competence or experience in the process.  While stating their support to improve it, frequently these individuals are not all that keen to see “their baby” changed.

So how does the belt address this potential roadblock when the stakeholder’s support may be lacking?

A key step is for the lead belt and the team is to identify the key stakeholders who could be in a position to impact the implementation of a new process.  Then the lead belt needs to engage with that stakeholder.

The most effective ways to bring a resistant stakeholder along are with engagement and good data.  Every LSS project requires data to measure performance and identify key factors that influence process variation and poor performance.  But that same data can hold the key to bringing a reluctant stakeholder along with you.

From the very beginning of the project key stakeholders should be identified and those who potentially may be resistant to change should be identified.  Seek out and engage those stakeholders.  Solicit their support and ideas.  Then as you move through the project supported by good process data show the stakeholder the facts.  Objective process “facts” will most often bring those stakeholders along.

The lead belt should not disagree with stakeholders.  They should objectively present the evidence in the form of good, valid and properly collected and analyzed data to show the stakeholder the facts of the process.  Questions such as “Have we missed something here” or “Would you interpret these results differently?” demonstrate your concern for the stakeholder’s position.

Stakeholder engagement should not be an end of project activity but an on-going one from the start of the project.  The last thing any team needs is to get to the Control Phase of a DMAIC project only to have a critical stakeholder communicate “not on my watch.”

Engage stakeholders early and often and bring them the objective evidence in the form of properly analyzed and displayed data.  In so doing the likelihood of DMAIC project success will soar and your solution will not only address the key root causes but also have the support of the organization.One the issues frequently faced by lean six sigma belts is the need to secure key stakeholder support for process changes.   Using the DMAIC approach the team should select the solution that best addresses the vital few root causes while also being acceptable to the organization.  In other words the new process needs to correct the process deficiencies AND have the support of the organization.

Oftentimes these changes go counter to “the way we’ve always done it” mindset.  And often the poor performing process was originally developed by a key stakeholder in the organization such as a senior manager or someone with established competence or experience in the process.  While stating their support to improve it, frequently these individuals are not all that keen to see “their baby” changed.

So how does the belt address this potential roadblock when the stakeholder’s support may be lacking?

A key step is for the lead belt and the team is to identify the key stakeholders who could be in a position to impact the implementation of a new process.  Then the lead belt needs to engage with that stakeholder.

The most effective ways to bring a resistant stakeholder along are with engagement and good data.  Every LSS project requires data to measure performance and identify key factors that influence process variation and poor performance.  But that same data can hold the key to bringing a reluctant stakeholder along with you.

From the very beginning of the project key stakeholders should be identified and those who potentially may be resistant to change should be identified.  Seek out and engage those stakeholders.  Solicit their support and ideas.  Then as you move through the project supported by good process data show the stakeholder the facts.  Objective process “facts” will most often bring those stakeholders along.

The lead belt should not disagree with stakeholders.  They should objectively present the evidence in the form of good, valid and properly collected and analyzed data to show the stakeholder the facts of the process.  Questions such as “Have we missed something here” or “Would you interpret these results differently?” demonstrate your concern for the stakeholder’s position.

Stakeholder engagement should not be an end of project activity but an on-going one from the start of the project.  The last thing any team needs is to get to the Control Phase of a DMAIC project only to have a critical stakeholder communicate “not on my watch.”

Engage stakeholders early and often and bring them the objective evidence in the form of properly analyzed and displayed data.  In so doing the likelihood of DMAIC project success will soar and your solution will not only address the key root causes but also have the support of the organization.One the issues frequently faced by lean six sigma belts is the need to secure key stakeholder support for process changes.   Using the DMAIC approach the team should select the solution that best addresses the vital few root causes while also being acceptable to the organization.  In other words the new process needs to correct the process deficiencies AND have the support of the organization.

Oftentimes these changes go counter to “the way we’ve always done it” mindset.  And often the poor performing process was originally developed by a key stakeholder in the organization such as a senior manager or someone with established competence or experience in the process.  While stating their support to improve it, frequently these individuals are not all that keen to see “their baby” changed.

So how does the belt address this potential roadblock when the stakeholder’s support may be lacking?

A key step is for the lead belt and the team is to identify the key stakeholders who could be in a position to impact the implementation of a new process.  Then the lead belt needs to engage with that stakeholder.

The most effective ways to bring a resistant stakeholder along are with engagement and good data.  Every LSS project requires data to measure performance and identify key factors that influence process variation and poor performance.  But that same data can hold the key to bringing a reluctant stakeholder along with you.

From the very beginning of the project key stakeholders should be identified and those who potentially may be resistant to change should be identified.  Seek out and engage those stakeholders.  Solicit their support and ideas.  Then as you move through the project supported by good process data show the stakeholder the facts.  Objective process “facts” will most often bring those stakeholders along.

The lead belt should not disagree with stakeholders.  They should objectively present the evidence in the form of good, valid and properly collected and analyzed data to show the stakeholder the facts of the process.  Questions such as “Have we missed something here” or “Would you interpret these results differently?” demonstrate your concern for the stakeholder’s position.

Stakeholder engagement should not be an end of project activity but an on-going one from the start of the project.  The last thing any team needs is to get to the Control Phase of a DMAIC project only to have a critical stakeholder communicate “not on my watch.”

Engage stakeholders early and often and bring them the objective evidence in the form of properly analyzed and displayed data.  In so doing the likelihood of DMAIC project success will soar and your solution will not only address the key root causes but also have the support of the organization.